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Archive for the ‘Strategic HR’ Category

First Graduates with HRTW Black Belt Certification

Congratulations goes out to four outstanding women who completed the year-long HR That Works Black Belt training program!

From left to right Leslie Thomas, Lisa Hecker, Tootie Norton, and Brenda Boyer.

Important Human Resource Considerations During a Merger or Acquisition

We are witnessing a great deal of M&A activity once again. While tough times produce many wonderful buying opportunities, all come with inherent risks. There are numerous risks you want to audit for from a human resource perspective including:

  1. How do the cultures of the two organizations different? Peter Drucker claimed that 2 out of 3 M&A’s fail due to cultural reasons. As Dr. Deming taught us, you have to drive the fear out of the situation. Fear that the acquired executives and employees will not respect your ways of doing business and fear on the part of the newcomers that you won’t be considerate of their insights. Great leaders take these fears head-on so that the M&A doesn’t get destroyed by unnecessary dramas.
  2. You want to look at the best HR practices from each organization. Does one company hire employees better than the other? How do they manage performance or motivate employees? What standards do they set for promotions? How do they manage compliance concerns? What sorts of training programs do they operate? Who has the “best practices”?
  3. The M&A process implies there will be a culling of the herd. How will you identify who is left off the bus in a way that doesn’t let go of the wrong employee and prevents you from getting sued in the process? Have your criteria for the inevitable layoffs and terminations been reviewed by employment counsel?
  4. Compensation and benefits is another very important consideration during the M&A process. Inevitably, executives and employees will be paid differently for doing the same or similar work. This will be an excellent time to revisit your compensation and benefit plans and strategies in general. Are you paying competitive salaries and wages? You have to look to the marketplace for that answer. What would you have to hire one of these employees for today? Are you using competitive benefits? As mentioned in previous posts, a dollar spent on benefits versus a dollar spent on compensation has a greater perceived value to employees. Consider this fact at a time when many companies are looking to shed benefits. Lastly, what can you learn from each other’s incentive programs? What boosts sales or productivity?

HR should be instrumental in making sure the “soft stuff” is addressed during the M&A process. HR That Works Members have access to an entire M&A audit that they should consider using during such a process.

10 Management Secrets That Will Guarantee Business Failure

July 18, 2011 1 comment

1. Make sure you hire from the bottom of the barrel – Bad employees are great! They will all but guarantee you a life full of drama. Why be on easy street when you can have a work force run amuck with whiners, thieves, liars and con-artists? Besides, who wants to spend the time and money necessary to do extensive interviews, skill tests, background checks and character assessments?

2. Over promise and under deliver – Tell people what you think they want to hear. It’s a lot more expedient than radical honesty. The fun thing is there is absolutely no limit on the amount of promises you can make. If somebody complains about the last promise you made then make him or her a new one. The fact is people want to be lied to. This “walk your talk” integrity stuff is strictly for amateurs.

3. Keep your business plans to yourself – All this talk about sharing your vision, mission and goals is pure bologna. People like to be kept in the dark. Besides, if mushrooms can thrive in that environment why can’t your employees?

4. Control as much as you can – Spending your time trying to empower other people is just so exhausting. Better off engaging in control and manipulation so that they don’t dare think for themselves. If they try to revolt, then bring in the heavy artillery.

5. Give them all 2s – Everybody knows that the way to motivate people is to scare the “you know what” out of them. One of the best ways of doing that is to give them poor performance evaluations. They will be fearful for their jobs and be motivated to work like crazy just to survive. In fact, it’s probably a good idea to give them disciplinary notices on a regular basis whether they deserve them or not.

6. Create internal competition – Ever see rats climb all over each other in order to get at a piece of cheese? Don’t think this doesn’t work with your employees too. Make it very clear there can only be one good employee every month. This is a particularly appropriate strategy in the sales area. Make sure only one person in your sales organization gets that trip to Hawaii every year. The less in the way of best practices they share with each other, the better your odds of motivating them out of a scarcity mentality.

7. Bag the meetings – This business about holding team meetings is highly overrated. Besides, it just takes people away from doing their jobs. The last thing you want to do is give people another excuse not to do their work.

8. Work ‘em ‘til they drop – Squeeze every ounce out of your employees every chance you get. Never mind that you have to pay them overtime or that they may burn out and make tons of mistakes. There’s plenty more bodies where they came from.

9. Ignore today’s compliance obligations – There are so many personnel law obligations that trying to reach the “Golden Shores of Compliance” is a futile effort at best. Better off letting your exposures run rampant and deal with them in the courtroom. Besides, we just love our lawyers.

10. Train solely from within – Or, forget training altogether! Better off recycling ignorance than employing profound knowledge – which can only be gathered from outside of a system.
SPECIAL BONUS SECRET:

11. Forget your commitments – This bonus secret is a real powerful one and brings us full circle. Besides, your workforce probably isn’t very committed to you. They say they want to work for you for years and then they quit after only a couple of months. What’s up with that?

These secrets will all but guarantee your business failure. One last note: Just make sure you bleed the company to a point of extinction before you employ these powerful secrets.

NOTE: If management failure is not your bag, then take full advantage of the HR That Works website!

Seven HR Strategies for Growing the Bottom Line

July 8, 2011 2 comments

Watch this short video of Don Phin explaining seven HR strategies that will help every company grow its bottom line.

Categories: Strategic HR, Videos

Software Advice publishes HR Market Trends Report for 2011

April 25, 2011 1 comment

HR That Works is a strategic HR program that makes good use of technology. HRIS systems are technology driven systems which are administrative in nature (like QuickBooks is for finance) and best at managing employee data…but they too can be used strategically. I came across this article on HRIS programs and I thought it would be of value to both our Partners and our Members:

Software Advice, an online resource for HR software reviews, recently posted their 2011 Market Trends Report for Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS). There is an expected employment growth rate of about 8% over 2011 according to a survey from Manpower’s Outlook. However, that growth will not drive demand for core HRIS systems. Software Advice suggests that firms will better leverage existing systems by implementing new applications. While HRIS demand will remain steady, it is likely that demand for strategic HR software will increase as firms up their hiring efforts and aim for a higher-performing workforce. Leading vendors will enhance their app portfolios through acquisitions, and we can expect to see some new blood in the market as the barriers to entry have lowered considerably in the past few years thanks to new deployment options.

Software Advice decided to track six high-level trends:

  • Core HR
  • Self-Service Applications
  • Management Dashboards
  • Strategic HR
  • Cloud HR Systems
  • New Entrants

You can read about each of these trends individually in the report, but we will dig into one in particular right now: Strategic HR.

The report predicts that this area will be the most active in terms of consolidation activity and will experience noticeable growth over 2011, despite the lowered demand during the recession. Talent management and performance management overlap quite a bit, sharing features such as recruitment automation, applicant tracking, and the onboarding and assessment of employees. Because of these apps, HR software vendors have been able to extend their reach, deploying hiring managers across the entire organizations. There have been several leaders in this area, but there is a micro-trend of core HR vendors entering this space as well. It will be interesting to watch this particular area develop over the year.

Categories: Strategic HR

How to Make HR Relevant

Here’s a podcast I listened to on HBR regarding HR.

Harvard Business IdeaCast 190: How to Make HR Relevant
Featured Guest: Susan Cantrell, fellow at the Accenture Institute for High Performance and coauthor of Workforce of One: Revolutionizing Talent Management Through Customization. Copyright 2010 Harvard Business School Publishing

Categories: Strategic HR

Why We (Shouldn’t) Hate HR

Here is a great HBR article that is a follow up to one that caused much stirring among HR folks a few years back. http://blogs.hbr.org/taylor/2010/06/why_we_shouldnt_hate_hr.html. Take a look at the comments I added to the article below it.

Categories: Strategic HR